Right now, there’s a good chance that you don’t really know what you’re getting from any source. Testing and labeling rules vary by state, but many states that allow legal cannabis also require some kind of testing to verify that the THC and CBD levels listed on the label are accurate. However, this testing is controversial, and results can vary widely between labs, Jikomes said. A study published in March found measurable variations in test results, with some labs consistently reporting higher or lower levels of cannabinoids than others. There are no guarantees that the label accurately reflects what’s in the product. For a 2015 study published in JAMA, researchers tested 75 products purchased in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Seattle and found that only 17 percent were accurately labeled. More than half of the products contained significantly lower levels of cannabinoids than the label promised, and some of them contained only negligible amounts of the compounds. “We need to come up with ways to confidently verify the composition of cannabis products and make this information available to consumers,” Jikomes said.

Cooper recently got funding from the National Institutes of Health for a study looking at cannabinoids — including CBD in isolation — as a substitute for opioids, and numerous other clinical trials of CBD are underway. It will be several years before results are available, but these studies should help clarify both what benefits the substance may provide and any side effects it may come with. Most of the adverse effects so far associated with cannabis, such as impairments in short-term memory, coordination and judgment,2 come from products that contain THC as well as CBD, Cooper said, but we need to do more studies to find out for sure whether CBD has fewer risks. Studies are also needed to identify the best way to administer and dose CBD. “I get emails from people asking me what dose of CBD to use, and the truth is, we really don’t know,” Cooper said.


Each case is unique, and you must consider your pet’s medical history. There are over 1500 prescription drugs for pets in the United States; each of them could interact in a different way with any supplement such as PurCBD. If your pet is on any prescription medication we recommend consulting with a veterinarian before administering any supplement, including our own. Our comprehensive dosing chart is the best place to start; the second page of the chart has a form to help you and your veterinarian coordinate the use of prescription meds with PurCBD. Here is the direct link to the planner:
Inhibited liver function: The liver regulates the way different drugs are metabolized within the body; this process is known as hepatic drug metabolism. Higher-than-average doses of CBD oil can slow the hepatic drug metabolism process. As a result, users may not be able to process other drugs as quickly. This is particularly concerning for CBD oil users who also take prescription medications.
“Our Frenchie, Uggs, was diagnosed with severe spinal issues and hip dysplasia at only 6 months old. After seeing three different vets, we were informed our little man could no longer go on walks, play/fetch his toys, or stand on any type of concrete or hard ground. He would sit on one side of his butt and shake in pain. He ended up needing to anti-inflammatory meds and muscle relaxers twice a day. This caused our baby to be constantly drugged up and sleeping. He was not the same dog.We decided to try VETCBD. Since then, our little man has not been on any hard medication, he is in no pain, and is back to being a happy and playful puppy. VETCBD has truly done wonders. We highly recommend this medicine to any furry friend in need as it has been a blessing to our family.” Uggs
Ingredients: Purified Water, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Extract, Squalane, Glycerin, Stearic Acid, Cetyl Alcohol, Stearyl Alcohol, Ethylene Glycol Distearate, Menthol, Sodium Acrylates Copolymer, Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil, Arnica Montana Flower Extract, Boswellia Serrata Extract, Allantoin, Propylene Glycol, Phenoxyethanol, Ethylhexylglycerin, Lecithin, Glycerylstereate, Peg 100, Stereate, Diasonilidyl, Tocopherol Acetate
Figuring out how much CBD oil to take can feel like trying to navigate through a complicated maze. The sheer volume of CBD brands on the market can create confusion for consumers, and when you take a closer look, it’s not difficult to understand why. Not only do vendors use different source materials (CBD-rich cannabis vs. industrial hemp, different strains, etc.), but they also implement different extraction techniques .

^ Jump up to: a b Devinsky, Orrin; Cilio, Maria Roberta; Cross, Helen; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier; French, Jacqueline; Hill, Charlotte; Katz, Russell; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Notcutt, William George; Martinez-Orgado, Jose; Robson, Philip J.; Rohrback, Brian G.; Thiele, Elizabeth; Whalley, Benjamin; Friedman, Daniel (22 May 2014). "Cannabidiol: Pharmacology and potential therapeutic role in epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric disorders". Epilepsia. 55 (6): 791–802. doi:10.1111/epi.12631. PMC 4707667. PMID 24854329.

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